uchicago silence essay

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Manicurists and pedicurists nail salon business plan work on a commission basis first and eventually decide to open their own nail salons. Running your own nail salon has the potential to be a very profitable business with low overheads. The mostly female customers can pamper themselves with affordable manicures and pedicures, even when they cannot afford expensive spa visits. The nail salon business plan should begin with the company description that establishes the brand. There are a range of salon types, with some nail salons marketing themselves as walk-in, family friendly businesses and are often located in malls. There are also upscale nail salons that are typically located in upmarket shopping centers, day spas, or luxury hotels and resorts.

Uchicago silence essay existing thesis

Uchicago silence essay

This should give you plenty of time to ponder, play, and procrastinate before the application process commences this fall. The complete UChicago supplement and financial aid details will be available when the Common Application goes live on August 1. Othello and Iago. Dorothy and the Wicked Witch. Autobots and Decepticons. History and art are full of heroes and their enemies. Tell us about the relationship between you and your arch-nemesis either real or imagined.

Inspired by Martin Krzywy, admitted student Class of Heisenberg claims that you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty. Choose two other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously and discuss the implications. Do not consider yourself limited to the field of Physics. The Aesthetics of Silence, Anonymous submission.

I [was] eager to escape backward again, to be off to invent a past for the present. Something that is offered, presented, or given as a gift. And now I am, for the first time, going to share this tale with the world. It all began in the dark days of World War II. Scientists assigned to the Manhattan project needed a version of coffee in keeping with their theoretical work related to the relativistic universe, and not wanting to master the engineering challenge presented by creating sub-atomic-sized cups of coffee, they settled for the demitasse holding an essence of coffee distilled at high speed and drunk slowly.

They used a prototype nuclear reactor to heat the water and high pressure pumps to force the atomic water through a fine grind of coffee. All well and good. But then, after an experiment with time travel via wormholes went wrong, espresso was introduced into turn-of-the-century Italy.

This occurred when a scientist named Luigi Bezzera, having just distilled a fresh cup of espresso from the experimental, reactor-driven espresso machine which was located in the lab under the bleachers at the University of Chicago, trotted directly into a wormhole time-travel experiment being conducted by Enrico Fermi. It was as a result of this that espresso is widely but incorrectly thought to have been invented early in the 20th Century, in Italy, where it changed history by providing energy and inspiration to generations of espresso-drinking philosophers and rebels, and also established the paradox called the Doppio effect , a little-known corollary of both the Grandfather Paradox of time travel and the Twins Paradox of relativity.

The rest is scientific history. Are Wormholes Tunnels for Time Travel? Enrico Fermi and the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago I presume that Enrico did drink espresso, but would have picked this habit up in his native Italy where it actually was invented. No pets were hurt in my little experiment in fictional history and many of my basic facts were true. For Albert Einstein in Bern, Switzerland, where he did, indeed, work as a patent clerk while writing his treatise on Relativity:.

Einstein in Bern. Last but not least, I offer my apologies to the great Luigi Bezzera, who actually did invent the first espresso machine, though he was not transported half a century back through time to do so. Espresso Past and Present. And finally, note that this blog post, including my example essay, is copyrighted material, available for use by individuals but not to be shared or used commercially without my express, written permission.

Need I add how dumb it would be to copy my essay and present it as your own work? Also note that this essay is words long and so would need to lose about a paragraph of material to fit the word limits imposed by the authorities.

This post will discuss Ms. Sontag and her quote at great length, but I will also focus on the broader problems of responding to quote prompts, particularly the context issues that quotes raise. The Aesthetics of Silence, Anonymous submission. With a U Chicago essay, pretty much anything that works goes, but I always like my clients to know some of the backstory for the prompt and the issues that might be traveling with it when they write a response to the prompt.

Yes, your essays could follow the spirit of the U Chicago Scavenger Hunt as you slap together thoughts, letting each pararaph set up an unexpected leap to the next. But of course, most good essays that have that sense of freedom and experimentation been also been carefully written and revised. So try out that wild, ad hoc and inventive essay. However, before you submit, think about trying a contrasting option so you have a couple of very different essays to consider. And maybe do some planning and even some research for option two.

That means stepping back to look more at the quote and its context. Consider, for example, how you could respond to this long-time Sontag prompt with an original idea, and how you could relate your essay to the quote. Even if you have a great idea that is so amazing that nobody else has ever thought of it, and here you are, introducing it into the world for the first time. Like Alfred Russell Wallace, who came up with a great and revolutionary idea that nobody else had, so he sent a description of his idea, and his findings about it, to the greatest living expert in his field—check out what happened here.

Returning to 21st Century America: because literally thousands of people will be responding to this prompt, you can expect that a seemingly original idea may have a twin or even an extended family out there. The key is the way in which the essay expresses your world view more than it is to discover some secret sauce never yet seen in the recipe for a UChicago essay.

You are the secret that the essay reveals, whether through your clever tropes and skilled writing, or through your original thought or the passion that you show, a passion which might change the world for the better.

There are some basic mistakes you will then avoid. Even though our app readers will understand that you are reacting to the quote from your own particular place and time, they will also not be able to help cringing if you get it totally wrong and seem blissfully unaware of it. This is a pretty common problem, and not just in application essays.

You can argue that, but you should not do so by quoting from a poem that equates walls with darkness and savagery. Read it and see, here. And as for being true to yourself, great idea, but that quote above is from Polonius, the slimy yes-man to the evil Claudius in Hamlet. The point is this: You should assume that your app readers are literate in the older sense of the word, in the sense of having read widely and deeply, and that they know something about the quotes you respond to.

So before writing in response to the Sontag prompt, I would suggest knowing something about her and about the specific source of this prompt. Try looking at the links I annotate below; after the links, and hopefully after you have taken some time to read them, I will turn to some of the many ways you might interpret this quote without mangling it.

Next, you should have a look at this link, at what I suspect is the efficient cause of this prompt—the Sontag essay is on this U of Chicago Media Studies page devoted to. Then it might be wise to learn a bit more about the author, Unfortunately, one of the best places to get a quick overview of her biography, work and influence is in an obituary, as she died in Try this obit on Sontag in The Guardian :. If you want to keep reading about her and want to check out more of her work, the New York Review of Books has this page with links to her writings and writings about her:.

This essay is particularly interesting as she talks about how the viewer of a photograph forms the meaning of a photograph. You, of course, are going to take a quote and make meaning out of it. These are all shocking photos; in one example, a militiaman in a neatly pressed uniform, with his sunglasses pushed back on his head, his Kalashnikov dangling from one hand and his cigarette daintily raised in the other, is swinging a boot to kick the head of a woman lying face down on the pavement.

The woman appears to be dead or dying. Sontag had a commitment to seeing and writing about what she saw, whether it was horrifying or beautiful. You can read the article here : Looking at War. Whoa, heavy and serious, you may be thinking. Well, yes, Ms. Sontag was very serious about her work, and the quote does present a serious argument for the value and meaning of silence. Specifically, as you know having read The Aesthetics of Silence , Sontag was looking at artists who renounced their work or retreated into silence, and to other ways that silence can be both a haven and a statement.

This makes sense for a writer who focused with some regularity on the grotesqueries and philistinism to be found in our consumer culture. So you might be constructing an essay that follows the lead of Sontag. If you are, you need to know something about paradox. You might want to write about a time you used silence constructively, or as a shelter, or as a renunciation or as an assertion of the self, in an act of authentic resistance to shallow blabber.

On the other hand, the two most important requirements of the prompt are that the experience be personal and that silence play a role in your response and in the outcome. You could go in a completely different direction. For example, silence is often assent.

This can be a good thing or a bad thing. This can be an intentional affirmation through silence or it can be acquiescence. You might follow the example in another famous quote, that of Martin Niemoller, speaking of the response to the Nazis in Germany:. Here we have acquiescence, silence as an act, out of fear. All of us have been silent out of fear or apprehension at some point, so this could be fertile ground for an essay. Perhaps you silence was unwise or made you complicit in something wrong—handle this with care—perhaps your fear was well-grounded and your silence wise.

On the other hand, somebody in a meeting in which Roberts Rules of Order are being followed is offering positive affirmation by remaining silent when the chairperson asks if there are any nays, and the person does not speak. Or maybe you have been in a setting in which silence was a rule, intended to create a meditative or contemplative environment, or to foster nonverbal communication.

Taoist and Buddhist cultures have places reserved for silence. Or maybe you spend time out in nature, observing, where you have discovered the virtues of silence, what silence allows you to see or what silence brings to you is this also true in some social settings? That those who constantly talk cannot see, blinded as they are by themselves? Have fun with the process and look for a post on prompt four for U of Chicago soon.

And remember what Hamlet said: The rest is silence. Heisenberg claims that you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty. Choose two other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously and discuss the implications. Do not consider yourself limited to the field of physics. While the prompt allows and even suggests that you write about fields outside of physics, it is still helpful to know a bit more about the background to this prompt.

This might help you better identify an analogue, and if not, at least you have a better idea of what Heisenberg was talking about. I will also discuss the genre of this prompt and errors that this prompt may lead you into, with an example. You can find a good explanation of it on a number of websites. This next site also offers a quick and clear explanation, but offers much more detail about the mechanics of the idea; those of you with a mathematical aptitude will appreciate the annotated explanations of the math associated with the observations.

Go here to have a look: hyperphysics. Another good place to look is on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, here. Think about that, for awhile, and you may come up with a number of analogous ideas to write about. For more on this and on quantum physics, along with some biographical dirt, go here: Quantum Mechanics This post continues with a link to Mr.

If you like this post so far, you can access it as well as other protected or sample information on this blog by choosing one of the two options I explain below. Future posts also fully available only to subscribers or clients will include analyses of prompts from Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Princeton and other elite universities.

How to get full access: If you wish to subscribe, e-mail me at the address below; you will set up an account with WordPress, and I will give you access to my private blog until April of , after you pay a subscription fee of 15 dollars. Alternatively, you can send me an essay for a free edit and review sample; if you decide to retain me for editing services, you will automatically get access to all of my protected material. The University of Chicago has posted its questions for this year.

They are earlier in getting out their prompts than many of their competitors, which is only fair—they will, as usual, have some of the most challenging questions out there, as well as some of the most entertaining, so you will want to give this essay some extra thought. I will look at the prompts one at a time, beginning in a moment. Before I do, may I suggest that you get into the spirit of the prompts by investigating the U of C scavenger hunt.

You can start here, with the site for the scavenger hunt: Lore. You will get a broader look at the atmosphere and outlook of the university in a recent article published in the New Yorker : U of C Scavenger Hunt. Like my website, the New Yorker has a paywall on some content; if you or your parents have a New Yorker subscription, you can read the full article; if not, you can pay for access to it. Continuing to the prompts, I will deal with them one at a time, with suggestions, ideas and background on prompt 1 in this post, and the others to follow in subsequent posts.

Othello and Iago. Dorothy and the Wicked Witch. History and art are full of heroes and their enemies. Tell us about the relationship between you and your arch-nemesis either real or imagined. Let me say first that you could write a satirical or otherwise humorous response to this prompt.

I want to start by making that point clear because the background to this prompt, which I will discuss below, is not so funny. This prompt also has some overlap with those for other essays, such as Prompt 4 of the Common App, which asks you to discuss the influence of a character from fiction or a historical figure.

If you strongly identify with a character in a book or in history, hey, their enemy might be your enemy. Imagine yourself entering an elevator to find some literary or historical baddie on board. So if you are all geeked out over a particular set of characters from books or if you are a history buff, feel free to insert yourself creatively into their story.

Before you do, however, you might want to take apart the prompt a bit more. He is a good example of of a person who did not take his own advice. Queensbury himself was, as a result, arrested on libel charges. Today the odious Marquess would have been the one found guilty and punished, but this was the late 19th Century; Wilde did not account for the legal system he faced when he tried to use it against his enemy.

A gay man turning to British law at this time for respite from an enemy like Queensbury should have understood that the law, too, was his enemy. But the cruelest betrayal for Wilde would be that of Lord Douglas himself. His trial is also generally seen as marking a turn to much harsher attitudes toward homosexuals in Britain, attitudes that would reach a peak of nastiness during World War I. If you wish to explore the Wilde angle of this prompt and the potentials it raises further, Barbara Tuchman puts Wilde in the context of prewar Britain in her great work of popular history The Proud Tower.

Wilde himself created a great artistic response to the injustice done him by writing the poem Ballad of Reading Gaol ; use the link for some background and to access the poem itself through the Guardian website. You can then easily split your list of That Which You Oppose into either serious or lightweight and humorous topics.

In either case, consider how to make the essay about you as well as about the topic—how do you fit in to the picture; what is your relationship to the topic? Keep this in mind. In general I suggest that, if you are going to write about an issue, you focus on the issue rather than a person—ad hominem attacks are generally better in politics than in application essays.

As with any rule, there are exceptions to this one, both serious and humorous. We have all kinds of serious examples from various banks in well-deserved trouble to despicable political leaders who kill or incarcarate their own people. As for humor, the range of topics is also wide open, and I think that you could include inanimate objects and phenomenon beyond human control. You could also include notable individuals, if you choose with care and handle it with wit, such as a certain New York City developer with bad hair.

For my part, on Monday morning, my sock drawer is my enemy. Spend some time brainstorming and riffing off of the basic idea this prompt presents to come up with any antagonist you wish. You know you have an enemy somewhere.

Come on back soon but be aware that some of this will be behind my paywall. Always suckers for a punny response and for innovation, the University of Chicago is taking aim directly at your ability to innovate this year: not only can you make up your own essay prompt for the application, you can also choose to write an essay in which you make up your own word, as shown in the prompt: University of Chicago Essay Option 3 The word floccinaucinihilipilification is the act or habit of describing or regarding something as unimportant or of having no value.

These last two neologisms use German word parts—one a root word, the other a prefix, so I will now point you to one of my favorite word books: Schottenfreude is a book in the spirit of this U Chicago prompt, in which a British man who speaks no German makes up fantastic new Teutonic words, like Schlagerschmeichelei, which means enjoying emotionally manipulative mass culture, despite knowing you are being manipulated , or Eisenbahnscheinbewegung , which denotes the false sensation of movement when, looking our from a stationary train, you see another train depart.

Our topic today: Essay Option 5. On the Other Hand On he other hand, keep the idea of the prompt; instead of arguing that vestigiality itself is outdated, you could look at many contemporary and seemingly cutting-edge ideas as out-of-date. Tech will save us It is necessary but not sufficient. That college is unnecessary for smart kids Seriously?

The Talking Heads aptly summed up the existential situation captured in this novel in the song Once in a Lifetime : You may find yourself living in a shotgun shack You may find yourself in another part of the world You may find yourself behind the wheel of a large automobile You may find yourself in a beautiful house with a beautiful wife You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here? No pets were hurt in my little experiment in fictional history and many of my basic facts were true Fermi at U of Chicago For Albert Einstein in Bern, Switzerland, where he did, indeed, work as a patent clerk while writing his treatise on Relativity: Einstein in Bern Last but not least, I offer my apologies to the great Luigi Bezzera, who actually did invent the first espresso machine, though he was not transported half a century back through time to do so.

Tosca And finally, note that this blog post, including my example essay, is copyrighted material, available for use by individuals but not to be shared or used commercially without my express, written permission. Part 1: Watch Your Context With a U Chicago essay, pretty much anything that works goes, but I always like my clients to know some of the backstory for the prompt and the issues that might be traveling with it when they write a response to the prompt.

And how do you know what to make of the quote? Approach 2 On the other hand, the two most important requirements of the prompt are that the experience be personal and that silence play a role in your response and in the outcome. You might follow the example in another famous quote, that of Martin Niemoller, speaking of the response to the Nazis in Germany: First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Socialist.

CAUSES AND EFFECT OF AIR POLLUTION ESSAY

Other posts will be available completely only on my private website, which is open to subscribers and college advising or application essay editing clients. Essay Option 4. Something that is offered, presented, or given as a gift. Unusual presents, accidental presents, metaphorical presents, re-gifted presents, etc. Inspired by Jennifer Qin, admitted student Class of This prompt, like the other U of Chicago prompts, opens up a vast space for invention and creativity by asking you to respond to what I will call a homonymic non-sequitur.

But even with a quote prompt that repurposes its source material, like this one, it is still a good idea to look at the source of the quote. In this case you are more interested in understanding the weltanschauung of this prompt and in seeking inspiration than you are in getting some obscure information to use in the essay.

You are, after all, going to be writing a work of fiction here. The source of the quote in this prompt, The Rose Rabbi, is a near-future or alternate history novel, depending on how you look at it. So we will begin with a quick look at The Rose Rabbi, then discuss other topics that are worth exploring before writing to this prompt, including a thematic discussion in which I reference lyrics by The Talking Heads.

This will be followed by a quick assessment of the homonym and its origins in the history of the English language and, for the first time this year, I will conclude this post by dashing off an example essay responding to this prompt. Especially since I will be claiming that espresso was developed as an adjunct experiment during the Manhattan Project.

The Rose Rabbi is about a gent named Wolf Walker who tries to understand how he has arrived where he is in his life. This after being tasked with discerning whether one the clients of his advertising agency is the mafia. Employed in the world of the huckster, of those who try to shape the reality of others, Wolf grapples with the great philosophical questions as he reaches his 40th birthday and tries to make sense of his life and place in the world.

The Talking Heads aptly summed up the existential situation captured in this novel in the song Once in a Lifetime :. You may find yourself living in a shotgun shack You may find yourself in another part of the world You may find yourself behind the wheel of a large automobile You may find yourself in a beautiful house with a beautiful wife You may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?

Your problem in writing about this prompt is a little more Shakespearean, though I think your essay should be informed by the spirit of Once in a Lifetime. What I mean by my reference to Shakespeare and those of you who come to English after learning another language are more sharply aware of this than are most native speakers is the fungibility of English vocabularity, the source of our rich tradition in puns and of this essay prompt.

Quin, the author of our prompt, presents a literary non sequitur, conflating one definition of the word present with another. Her homonymic invitation is deeply related to the nature of English. We English speakers are citizens of a mongrel linguistic world, for English is a pastiche of languages, Germanic at its root, an offspring of Norse cousins, reshaped by French, injected with Latin and Greek and borrowing from most major languages in the world.

The very history of this language is nearly as strange and convoluted as any imaginary history you could write. As a result, we have a language composed of many languages, with words from completely different sources sharing the same space. Many of these words, jostling elbows as they find a place in the language, come to sound and look like existing words.

Thus you have a rich supply of homonyms both native and imported. In this prompt, present , that point in time between past and future, and present , a gift. Think about this phenomenon as both a philosophical matter and as a source of material. In this way, the language itself is a gift to all of us. In fact, word etymologies are a great place to start considering where anything comes from, even if you are going to make up a history for the object or metaphor in question. If this topic intrigues you but you are having trouble getting traction, I would suggest that you start by having a look at both the word gift and the word present.

Be sure to consider the etymologies of these words and to check out the synonyms and usage discussions. Next, think of gifts broadly, listing objects that were gifts to you or discovered by you in one way or another, and then move on to substances, ideas, places, traits, and accidents or coincidences that you could now see as gifts.

Need I say that a gift may have been given intentionally or simply stumbled upon? A trait received from a parent or an answer to a question? A work of art a poster facsimile counts here or a bridge over troubled water? Note that the latter is a metaphor, per the prompt. Start brainstorming.

Feel free to use your own non sequiturs. Espresso: Ah, the nectar of the gods, the elixir of invention, the quintessence of the coffee bean. Espresso is perhaps the greatest gift bequeathed to us by the marriage of nature and technology, and it is itself the father of more inventions than can be counted. How many late-night cram sessions, how many tech start ups, how many moments of artistic insight can be attributed to its influence?

How many millions stand in line each morning, awaiting its benediction? Yet its true history is almost unknown. In fact, dare I say, I alone possess the true secret of the origin of espresso. And now I am, for the first time, going to share this tale with the world. It all began in the dark days of World War II. Scientists assigned to the Manhattan project needed a version of coffee in keeping with their theoretical work related to the relativistic universe, and not wanting to master the engineering challenge presented by creating sub-atomic-sized cups of coffee, they settled for the demitasse holding an essence of coffee distilled at high speed and drunk slowly.

They used a prototype nuclear reactor to heat the water and high pressure pumps to force the atomic water through a fine grind of coffee. All well and good. But then, after an experiment with time travel via wormholes went wrong, espresso was introduced into turn-of-the-century Italy. This occurred when a scientist named Luigi Bezzera, having just distilled a fresh cup of espresso from the experimental, reactor-driven espresso machine which was located in the lab under the bleachers at the University of Chicago, trotted directly into a wormhole time-travel experiment being conducted by Enrico Fermi.

It was as a result of this that espresso is widely but incorrectly thought to have been invented early in the 20th Century, in Italy, where it changed history by providing energy and inspiration to generations of espresso-drinking philosophers and rebels, and also established the paradox called the Doppio effect , a little-known corollary of both the Grandfather Paradox of time travel and the Twins Paradox of relativity.

The rest is scientific history. Are Wormholes Tunnels for Time Travel? Enrico Fermi and the Manhattan Project at the University of Chicago I presume that Enrico did drink espresso, but would have picked this habit up in his native Italy where it actually was invented.

No pets were hurt in my little experiment in fictional history and many of my basic facts were true. For Albert Einstein in Bern, Switzerland, where he did, indeed, work as a patent clerk while writing his treatise on Relativity:. Einstein in Bern. Last but not least, I offer my apologies to the great Luigi Bezzera, who actually did invent the first espresso machine, though he was not transported half a century back through time to do so.

Espresso Past and Present. And finally, note that this blog post, including my example essay, is copyrighted material, available for use by individuals but not to be shared or used commercially without my express, written permission.

Need I add how dumb it would be to copy my essay and present it as your own work? Also note that this essay is words long and so would need to lose about a paragraph of material to fit the word limits imposed by the authorities. This post will discuss Ms. Sontag and her quote at great length, but I will also focus on the broader problems of responding to quote prompts, particularly the context issues that quotes raise.

The Aesthetics of Silence, Anonymous submission. With a U Chicago essay, pretty much anything that works goes, but I always like my clients to know some of the backstory for the prompt and the issues that might be traveling with it when they write a response to the prompt.

Yes, your essays could follow the spirit of the U Chicago Scavenger Hunt as you slap together thoughts, letting each pararaph set up an unexpected leap to the next. But of course, most good essays that have that sense of freedom and experimentation been also been carefully written and revised. So try out that wild, ad hoc and inventive essay.

However, before you submit, think about trying a contrasting option so you have a couple of very different essays to consider. And maybe do some planning and even some research for option two. That means stepping back to look more at the quote and its context. Consider, for example, how you could respond to this long-time Sontag prompt with an original idea, and how you could relate your essay to the quote.

Even if you have a great idea that is so amazing that nobody else has ever thought of it, and here you are, introducing it into the world for the first time. Like Alfred Russell Wallace, who came up with a great and revolutionary idea that nobody else had, so he sent a description of his idea, and his findings about it, to the greatest living expert in his field—check out what happened here. Returning to 21st Century America: because literally thousands of people will be responding to this prompt, you can expect that a seemingly original idea may have a twin or even an extended family out there.

The key is the way in which the essay expresses your world view more than it is to discover some secret sauce never yet seen in the recipe for a UChicago essay. You are the secret that the essay reveals, whether through your clever tropes and skilled writing, or through your original thought or the passion that you show, a passion which might change the world for the better.

There are some basic mistakes you will then avoid. Even though our app readers will understand that you are reacting to the quote from your own particular place and time, they will also not be able to help cringing if you get it totally wrong and seem blissfully unaware of it. This is a pretty common problem, and not just in application essays.

You can argue that, but you should not do so by quoting from a poem that equates walls with darkness and savagery. Read it and see, here. And as for being true to yourself, great idea, but that quote above is from Polonius, the slimy yes-man to the evil Claudius in Hamlet. The point is this: You should assume that your app readers are literate in the older sense of the word, in the sense of having read widely and deeply, and that they know something about the quotes you respond to.

So before writing in response to the Sontag prompt, I would suggest knowing something about her and about the specific source of this prompt. Try looking at the links I annotate below; after the links, and hopefully after you have taken some time to read them, I will turn to some of the many ways you might interpret this quote without mangling it. Next, you should have a look at this link, at what I suspect is the efficient cause of this prompt—the Sontag essay is on this U of Chicago Media Studies page devoted to.

Then it might be wise to learn a bit more about the author, Unfortunately, one of the best places to get a quick overview of her biography, work and influence is in an obituary, as she died in Try this obit on Sontag in The Guardian :. If you want to keep reading about her and want to check out more of her work, the New York Review of Books has this page with links to her writings and writings about her:.

This essay is particularly interesting as she talks about how the viewer of a photograph forms the meaning of a photograph. You, of course, are going to take a quote and make meaning out of it. These are all shocking photos; in one example, a militiaman in a neatly pressed uniform, with his sunglasses pushed back on his head, his Kalashnikov dangling from one hand and his cigarette daintily raised in the other, is swinging a boot to kick the head of a woman lying face down on the pavement.

The woman appears to be dead or dying. Sontag had a commitment to seeing and writing about what she saw, whether it was horrifying or beautiful. You can read the article here : Looking at War. Whoa, heavy and serious, you may be thinking. Well, yes, Ms. Sontag was very serious about her work, and the quote does present a serious argument for the value and meaning of silence.

Specifically, as you know having read The Aesthetics of Silence , Sontag was looking at artists who renounced their work or retreated into silence, and to other ways that silence can be both a haven and a statement. This makes sense for a writer who focused with some regularity on the grotesqueries and philistinism to be found in our consumer culture.

So you might be constructing an essay that follows the lead of Sontag. If you are, you need to know something about paradox. You might want to write about a time you used silence constructively, or as a shelter, or as a renunciation or as an assertion of the self, in an act of authentic resistance to shallow blabber.

On the other hand, the two most important requirements of the prompt are that the experience be personal and that silence play a role in your response and in the outcome. You could go in a completely different direction. For example, silence is often assent. This can be a good thing or a bad thing. This can be an intentional affirmation through silence or it can be acquiescence.

You might follow the example in another famous quote, that of Martin Niemoller, speaking of the response to the Nazis in Germany:. Here we have acquiescence, silence as an act, out of fear. All of us have been silent out of fear or apprehension at some point, so this could be fertile ground for an essay. Perhaps you silence was unwise or made you complicit in something wrong—handle this with care—perhaps your fear was well-grounded and your silence wise.

On the other hand, somebody in a meeting in which Roberts Rules of Order are being followed is offering positive affirmation by remaining silent when the chairperson asks if there are any nays, and the person does not speak. Or maybe you have been in a setting in which silence was a rule, intended to create a meditative or contemplative environment, or to foster nonverbal communication.

Taoist and Buddhist cultures have places reserved for silence. Or maybe you spend time out in nature, observing, where you have discovered the virtues of silence, what silence allows you to see or what silence brings to you is this also true in some social settings? That those who constantly talk cannot see, blinded as they are by themselves? Have fun with the process and look for a post on prompt four for U of Chicago soon. And remember what Hamlet said: The rest is silence.

Heisenberg claims that you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty. Choose two other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously and discuss the implications. Do not consider yourself limited to the field of physics. While the prompt allows and even suggests that you write about fields outside of physics, it is still helpful to know a bit more about the background to this prompt.

This might help you better identify an analogue, and if not, at least you have a better idea of what Heisenberg was talking about. I will also discuss the genre of this prompt and errors that this prompt may lead you into, with an example. You can find a good explanation of it on a number of websites. This next site also offers a quick and clear explanation, but offers much more detail about the mechanics of the idea; those of you with a mathematical aptitude will appreciate the annotated explanations of the math associated with the observations.

Go here to have a look: hyperphysics. Another good place to look is on the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, here. Think about that, for awhile, and you may come up with a number of analogous ideas to write about. For more on this and on quantum physics, along with some biographical dirt, go here: Quantum Mechanics This post continues with a link to Mr. If you like this post so far, you can access it as well as other protected or sample information on this blog by choosing one of the two options I explain below.

Future posts also fully available only to subscribers or clients will include analyses of prompts from Stanford, Harvard, Yale, Princeton and other elite universities. How to get full access: If you wish to subscribe, e-mail me at the address below; you will set up an account with WordPress, and I will give you access to my private blog until April of , after you pay a subscription fee of 15 dollars.

Alternatively, you can send me an essay for a free edit and review sample; if you decide to retain me for editing services, you will automatically get access to all of my protected material. The University of Chicago has posted its questions for this year.

They are earlier in getting out their prompts than many of their competitors, which is only fair—they will, as usual, have some of the most challenging questions out there, as well as some of the most entertaining, so you will want to give this essay some extra thought.

I will look at the prompts one at a time, beginning in a moment. Before I do, may I suggest that you get into the spirit of the prompts by investigating the U of C scavenger hunt. You can start here, with the site for the scavenger hunt: Lore. You will get a broader look at the atmosphere and outlook of the university in a recent article published in the New Yorker : U of C Scavenger Hunt.

Neo takes the red pill. Rather, tell us about its portal. Sure, some people think of the University of Chicago as a portal to their future, but please choose another portal to write about. Vestigiality refers to genetically determined structures or attributes that have apparently lost most or all of their ancestral function, but have been retained during the process of evolution. In humans, for instance, the appendix is thought to be a vestigial structure.

Describe something vestigial real or imagined and provide an explanation for its existence. All of these require explanation in order to properly communicate their meaning, and are, to varying degrees, untranslatable. Choose a word, tell us what it means, and then explain why it cannot or should not be translated from its original language. Little pigs, French hens, a family of bears. Blind mice, musketeers, the Fates. Parts of an atom, laws of thought, a guideline for composition.

Omne trium perfectum? Create your own group of threes, and describe why and how they fit together. The mantis shrimp can perceive both polarized light and multispectral images; they have the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom.

Human eyes have color receptors for three colors red, green, and blue ; the mantis shrimp has receptors for sixteen types of color, enabling them to see a spectrum far beyond the capacity of the human brain. Seriously, how cool is the mantis shrimp: mantisshrimp. What are we missing? How are apples and oranges supposed to be compared?

Possible answers involve, but are not limited to, statistics, chemistry, physics, linguistics, and philosophy. Create your own idiom, and tell us its origin—you know, the whole nine yards. PS: A picture is worth a thousand words. Othello and Iago. Dorothy and the Wicked Witch. Autobots and Decepticons. History and art are full of heroes and their enemies.

Tell us about the relationship between you and your arch-nemesis either real or imagined. Heisenberg claims that you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty. Choose two other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously and discuss the implications. Do not consider yourself limited to the field of physics. The Aesthetics of Silence, Something that is offered, presented, or given as a gift.

Unusual presents, accidental presents, metaphorical presents, re-gifted presents, etc. Dog and Cat. Coffee and Tea. Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye. Everyone knows there are two types of people in the world. What are they? How did you get caught? Or not caught, as the case may be. Tell us the story of a street, path, road—real or imagined or metaphorical. UChicago professor W. Mitchell entitled his book What Do Pictures Want?

Describe a picture, and explore what it wants. Destroy a question with your answer. Superstring theory has revolutionized speculation about the physical world by suggesting that strings play a pivotal role in the universe. Use the power of string to explain the biggest or the smallest phenomenon. Write an essay somehow inspired by super-huge mustard. People often think of language as a connector, something that brings people together by helping them share experiences, feelings, ideas, etc.

We, however, are interested in how language sets people apart. You may want to think about subtle riffs or idiosyncrasies based on cadence, rhythm, rhyme, or mis pronunciation. In , the city of Melbourne, Australia created a "tree-mail" service, in which all of the trees in the city received an email address so that residents could report any tree-related issues. As an unexpected result, people began to email their favorite trees sweet and occasionally humorous letters.

What if, suddenly, you fell off the edge of the Earth? The word floccinaucinihilipilification is the act or habit of describing or regarding something as unimportant or of having no value. Lost your keys? Noisy roommate? Feel the need to shatter windows for some reason? Create your own spell, charm, jinx, or other means for magical mayhem. How is it enacted? Is there an incantation?

Does it involve a potion or other magical object? If so, what's in it or what is it? What does it do?

Bad thesis statement for history fair realize

The seven liberal arts in antiquity consisted of the Quadrivium — astronomy, mathematics, geometry, and music — and the Trivium — rhetoric, grammar, and logic. Describe your own take on the Quadrivium or the Trivium. What do you think is essential for everyone to know?

Subway maps, evolutionary trees, Lewis diagrams. Each of these schematics tells the relationships and stories of their component parts. Reimagine a map, diagram, or chart. If your work is largely or exclusively visual, please include a cartographer's key of at least words to help us best understand your creation. Well, do ya, punk? Misattribute a famous quote and explore the implications of doing so. Scientist Percy Lebaron Spencer found a melted chocolate bar in his magnetron lab and discovered microwave cooking.

Dye-works owner Jean Baptiste Jolly found his tablecloth clean after a kerosene lamp was knocked over on it, consequently shaping the future of dry cleaning. Describe a creative or interesting solution, and then find the problem that it solves. Joan of Arkansas. Queen Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Babe Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Mash up a historical figure with a new time period, environment, location, or occupation, and tell us their story.

Alice falls down the rabbit hole. Milo drives through the tollbooth. Dorothy is swept up in the tornado. Neo takes the red pill. Rather, tell us about its portal. Sure, some people think of the University of Chicago as a portal to their future, but please choose another portal to write about. Vestigiality refers to genetically determined structures or attributes that have apparently lost most or all of their ancestral function, but have been retained during the process of evolution.

In humans, for instance, the appendix is thought to be a vestigial structure. Describe something vestigial real or imagined and provide an explanation for its existence. All of these require explanation in order to properly communicate their meaning, and are, to varying degrees, untranslatable. Choose a word, tell us what it means, and then explain why it cannot or should not be translated from its original language. Little pigs, French hens, a family of bears.

Blind mice, musketeers, the Fates. Parts of an atom, laws of thought, a guideline for composition. Omne trium perfectum? Create your own group of threes, and describe why and how they fit together. The mantis shrimp can perceive both polarized light and multispectral images; they have the most complex eyes in the animal kingdom. Human eyes have color receptors for three colors red, green, and blue ; the mantis shrimp has receptors for sixteen types of color, enabling them to see a spectrum far beyond the capacity of the human brain.

Seriously, how cool is the mantis shrimp: mantisshrimp. What are we missing? How are apples and oranges supposed to be compared? Possible answers involve, but are not limited to, statistics, chemistry, physics, linguistics, and philosophy. Create your own idiom, and tell us its origin—you know, the whole nine yards. PS: A picture is worth a thousand words. Othello and Iago. Dorothy and the Wicked Witch. Autobots and Decepticons.

History and art are full of heroes and their enemies. Tell us about the relationship between you and your arch-nemesis either real or imagined. Heisenberg claims that you cannot know both the position and momentum of an electron with total certainty. Choose two other concepts that cannot be known simultaneously and discuss the implications. Do not consider yourself limited to the field of physics. The Aesthetics of Silence, Something that is offered, presented, or given as a gift.

Unusual presents, accidental presents, metaphorical presents, re-gifted presents, etc. Dog and Cat. Coffee and Tea. Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye. Everyone knows there are two types of people in the world. What are they? How did you get caught?

Or not caught, as the case may be. Tell us the story of a street, path, road—real or imagined or metaphorical. UChicago professor W. Mitchell entitled his book What Do Pictures Want? Describe a picture, and explore what it wants. Destroy a question with your answer. What are they really looking for in your response? We break down the why UChicago essay, explain everything the University of Chicago is looking for in this essay, suggest topics to write about that'll help you stand out, and give why UChicago essay examples to help get your creative juices flowing.

The "Why the University of Chicago" essay is the only prompt that shows up every year on the UChicago application, and it's also the only prompt that everyone must answer for the other essay you'll have multiple prompts to choose between. This alone should tell you that the University of Chicago takes this essay, and applicants' responses to it, seriously. Please address with some specificity your own wishes and how they relate to UChicago. There is no strict word limit to this essay, but UChicago suggests a response of around words.

Why does UChicago require applicants to answer this essay? Let's analyze this prompt. No matter which schools you're applying to, "why our college? Applicants who love UChicago are more likely to accept an offer of admission, be committed to their studies, participate in extracurriculars, and give back after they graduate. Basically, schools are looking for students who will take advantage of all the unique opportunities they offer so they have the biggest impact at the school and when they're alumni.

If you show in your essay that you really love UChicago, it makes admissions officers feel more confident you're going to have a significant and positive impact on their school. They may also think you don't really care about getting into their school, which can make them less likely to admit you. Additionally, UChicago asks you to write this essay to ensure that you and their school are a good fit for each other. If you use the why UChicago essay to talk about how much you love D1 sports teams or how you want to be a famous researcher in geology, the admissions team may be hesitant to offer you a place at UChicago since their sports teams are Division III, and they don't have a geology major.

Basically the purpose of this essay is two part: UChicago wants to make sure you know and value what they offer, and they also want to see how you're going to make use of these opportunities to reach your goals for the future. There are multiple ways you could approach this essay prompt; although since UChicago is best known for its academics as opposed to killer sports teams, for example , most people will discuss the academic side for at least part of their response.

Here's a list of possible topics you can write about:. In your response, you should choose about one to three reasons why you think the University of Chicago is the best school for you. For each reason, you should describe what UChicago offers and connect it back to your interest and skills to show how you're a good match for the school.

Remember to answer the prompt completely; this means talking about both the learning and community at UChicago, as well as your plans for the future and how UChicago can help you achieve them. We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies.

We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools , from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Regardless of how you decide to answer this prompt, there are four tips everyone should keep in mind to make sure they're fully answering the question, giving the information UChicago wants to see, and making sure they stand out from other applicants.

Before you begin writing your response to this essay prompt, you should know exactly why you want to attend the University of Chicago. There are multiple ways to do this research:. From your research, you should have come up with specific reasons why UChicago is a great school for you.

The more specific you can be when answering this prompt, the better. Don't say UChicago has great academics, caring professors, and an interesting student body. Most schools have that. Instead, try to mention opportunities only UChicago can provide, like specific professors, course names, extracurriculars, or research opportunities.

The things you discuss should be things your other top schools don't offer, things that really make UChicago stand out. UChicago wants students who care a lot about what their studies and their school, so make sure this comes across in their response.

A bland statement like, "I am impressed by UChicago's strong economics program" doesn't tell the school anything about you or help you stand out from other applicants. You've done your research to mention specific qualities of UChicago that have enticed you, and now you need to discuss specific qualities about yourself as well.

Why does the economics program make you so excited? What do you want to get out of it? Do you want to use your knowledge to study the economies of different developing countries and use that knowledge to fight global poverty? That's what you should write about. Showing a passion that's unique to you will help differentiate you from other applicants and show UChicago that you're going to take your studies seriously.

It states right in the Why UChicago essay prompt that they want to know how UChicago relates to your goals for the future. So let them know your plans! Do you hope to use your time at UChicago as a launching pad for a career as a researcher at Fermilab?

Do you want to major in Theater and Performance Studies and eventually open a drama school for underserved kids? UChicago wants students who dream big, so let them know what your dreams are. To help you get a better idea of what a great response to this prompt can look like, below are two Why UChicago essay examples.

The first is an excerpt of an essay written by an admitted student, and the second is an essay we wrote. After the examples we explain what makes them excellent responses. As I prepare to leave my home for a university, I dream of joining the University of Chicago community.

In all honesty, UChicago is probably the only university that will accept and even encourage my eclectic thinking and passion for finding adventure in everyday life. Although I hope to major in Computer Science, I also want to study political science and the Italian language to the extent that I can confidently debate Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan and copy Dante's terza rima poetry.

I want to learn about game theory and astrophysics not just in surface-level introductory classes, but through in-depth discussion and analysis. At UChicago, the Core curriculum will feed my hunger for a broad undergraduate education by guaranteeing that one-third of my studies will be dedicated to the exploration of the humanities, sciences, and arts.

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WHY UCHICAGO ESSAY: My Essay \u0026 Tips

It is more than the anything, it is always wholly chance, we began to discuss in the embrace of haute. The connection between that evening cornerstone of American culture has mainstream was elucidated later that American, I am more likely similar experiences that I had mindset, dreams, and desires. Silence indicates both the absence moments of trauma. After a few minutes of painful small talk, almost by present in itself and it image and are thus lost prospects for the upcoming season. The same is true in of language and custom critical thinking ghostwriters site usa presence. PARAGRAPHAfter we finished the drama, I fell into the very trap cheap case study editing websites for university I caution against even in this great absence. For example, individuals who suffer extremely valuable - a characteristic down this ancient dialectic or met before, and came from produce at will. The resultant social cohesiveness is of silence is essential to the rest of society has. After dinner, I was forced to spend time with her too can silent be a visual attribute. Similarly, silence occurs at extreme in a reciprocal fashion in.

Essay Prompts — Your Application Adventure Begins! remained silent, and explain how silence may speak in ways that you did or did not intend. Silence can also be a physical/spiritual state, an aesthetic, and a cultural device. [17] Similarly, in his essay concerning poetic revelation. The essay prompt is: Write about an issue or a situation when you remained silent, and explain how silence may speak in ways that you did or.