literary response essay edu

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Manicurists and pedicurists nail salon business plan work on a commission basis first and eventually decide to open their own nail salons. Running your own nail salon has the potential to be a very profitable business with low overheads. The mostly female customers can pamper themselves with affordable manicures and pedicures, even when they cannot afford expensive spa visits. The nail salon business plan should begin with the company description that establishes the brand. There are a range of salon types, with some nail salons marketing themselves as walk-in, family friendly businesses and are often located in malls. There are also upscale nail salons that are typically located in upmarket shopping centers, day spas, or luxury hotels and resorts.

Literary response essay edu cheap letter proofreading services for phd

Literary response essay edu

He is a burned-out case. Somewhere in the past his problems must have become too much for him, and he gave up. He could have found meaning in his life by deciding to fight his troubles like Jim, but he didn't, and now he is a sad shadow of a man. Without determination and the desire to face his hardships, he lost his chance to make his life meaningful. Concluding paragraph. Skip to navigation Search Hunter. Advanced Search…. Murray and Anna C. For magazines, give the date of publication.

Write an informative summary of the material. Condense the content of the work by highlighting its main points and key supporting points. Use direct quotations from the work to illustrate important ideas. Summarize the material so that the reader gets a general sense of all key aspects of the original work. Do not discuss in great detail any single aspect of the work, and do not neglect to mention other equally important points. Also, keep the summary objective and factual.

Do not include in the first part of the paper your personal reaction to the work; your subjective impression will form the basis of the second part of your paper. How is the assigned work related to ideas and concerns discussed in the course for which you are preparing the paper? For example, what points made in the course textbook, class discussions, or lectures are treated more fully in the work? How is the work related to problems in our present-day world?

How is the material related to your life, experiences, feelings and ideas? For instance, what emotions did the work arouse in you? Did the work increase your understanding of a particular issue? Did it change your perspective in any way? Evaluate the merit of the work: the importance of its points, its accuracy, completeness, organization, and so on. You should also indicate here whether or not you would recommend the work to others, and why.

Make sure each major paragraph presents and then develops a single main point. For example, in the sample report that follows, the first paragraph summarizes the book, and the three paragraphs that follow detail three separate reactions of the student writer to the book.

The student then closes the report with a short concluding paragraph. Support any general points you make or attitudes you express with specific reasons and details. Statements such as "I agree with many ideas in this article" or "I found the book very interesting" are meaningless without specific evidence that shows why you feel as you do. Look at the sample report closely to see how the main point or topic sentence of each paragraph is developed by specific supporting evidence.

Organize your material. Follow the basic plan of organization explained above: a summary of one or more paragraphs, a reaction of two or more paragraphs, and a conclusion. Also, use transitions to make the relationships among ideas in the paper clear. Edit the paper carefully for errors in grammar, mechanics, punctuation, word use, and spelling. Cite paraphrased or quoted material from the book or article you are writing about, or from any other works, by using the appropriate documentation style.

If you are unsure what documentation style is required or recommended, ask you instructor. You may use quotations in the summary and reaction parts of the paper, but do not rely on them too much. Use them only to emphasize key ideas. Publishing information can be incorporated parenthetically or at the bottom of the page in a footnote. What words, phrases, images, or snippets of dialogue indicate this tone?

Figurative language: What figurative language or literary devices do you notice? Why do you think certain images appear? What kinds of patterns of language do you notice, and what significance might these patterns or literary devices have on the story or poem? In addition to these basic literary analysis questions, some helpful tips for writing this kind of essay: Take notes as you read.

Use highlighters to mark quotations or passages that jump out at you, along with post-it notes or page clips to mark those pages so you can find them again when writing the essay. Don't be afraid to write notes in the margins of the book. If you must sell back the book to the bookstore, or don't want to mark the book for other reasons, you can use post-it notes to write your responses. Essentially, effective note-taking is like having a conversation with the text.

Keep a document or journal open to record your ideas as you read. For example, refer to the image at the top of this page. This way, you can begin responding to the text as you read it, making efficient use of your time. You can then simply develop your reading notes in the essay. Cite passages to support your analyses.

Like in an argumentative or persuasive essay, be ready to drop quotations or paraphrase into the essay to support your analysis and show those reading your essay examples of what you are talking about. Be ready to provide page or line numbers to cite the source.

For example, if you say Hamlet the main character of Hamlet by William Shakespeare comes across as whiny and egotistical, be prepared to quote or paraphrase the play and point readers to the act, scene, and line numbers which show your point.

Example Student Response Essay Prompt Length requirement: words minimum no maximum, but please keep it under 5 pages if possible Essay type: Response Number of sources required: One: the primary text you are analyzing. Use MLA citations and formatting. Objective By the end of this assignment, students will be able to engage with a work of literature through analysis and response.

Directions Students will choose one work of literature to analyze that is, pick apart, zooming in, and looking closely at the literary devices and narrative elements of the story. Avoid using Shmoop, Cliffnotes, or any other plot summary websites.

These will tarnish your reading process. I know what happens in the stories. What stuck out to you? Why do you think the author made the choices they did?

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After reading the text and analyzing its narrative voice and structure, you can develop the answer into a more nuanced and arguable thesis statement:. Mary Shelley uses shifting narrative perspectives to portray Frankenstein in an increasingly negative light as the novel goes on. The aim is to keep you focused as you analyze the text.

To support your thesis statement, your essay will build an argument using textual evidence —specific parts of the text that demonstrate your point. This evidence is quoted and analyzed throughout your essay to explain your argument to the reader. It can be useful to comb through the text in search of relevant quotations before you start writing. Your title should clearly indicate what your analysis will focus on. Keep it as concise and engaging as possible.

A common approach to the title is to use a relevant quote from the text, followed by a colon and then the rest of your title. The essay introduction provides a quick overview of where your argument is going. A typical structure for an introduction is to begin with a general statement about the text and author, using this to lead into your thesis statement. You might refer to a commonly held idea about the text and show how your thesis will contradict it, or zoom in on a particular device you intend to focus on.

This is called signposting. In this reading, protagonist Victor Frankenstein is a stable representation of the callous ambition of modern science throughout the novel. This essay, however, argues that far from providing a stable image of the character, Shelley uses shifting narrative perspectives to portray Frankenstein in an increasingly negative light as the novel goes on.

If you do write the introduction first, you should still return to it later to make sure it lines up with what you ended up writing, and edit as necessary. The body of your essay is everything between the introduction and conclusion. It contains your arguments and the textual evidence that supports them. A typical structure for a high school literary analysis essay consists of five paragraphs : the three paragraphs of the body, plus the introduction and conclusion.

Each paragraph in the main body should focus on one topic. In the five-paragraph model, try to divide your argument into three main areas of analysis, all linked to your thesis. In longer essays, the same principle applies on a broader scale. For example, you might have two or three sections in your main body, each with multiple paragraphs.

Within these sections, you still want to begin new paragraphs at logical moments—a turn in the argument or the introduction of a new idea. A good topic sentence allows a reader to see at a glance what the paragraph is about. It can introduce a new line of argument and connect or contrast it with the previous paragraph.

A key part of literary analysis is backing up your arguments with relevant evidence from the text. This involves introducing quotes from the text and explaining their significance to your point. Here, you summarize your key points and try to emphasize their significance to the reader. Far from the one-dimensional villain he is often taken to be, the character of Frankenstein is compelling because of the dynamic narrative frame in which he is placed.

Have a language expert improve your writing. Check your paper for plagiarism in 10 minutes. Do the check. Generate your APA citations for free! APA Citation Generator. Home Knowledge Base Essay A step-by-step guide to literary analysis. A step-by-step guide to literary analysis Published on January 30, by Jack Caulfield. As you write, follow the standard structure of an academic essay : An introduction that tells the reader what your essay will focus on.

A main body, divided into paragraphs , that builds an argument using evidence from the text. A conclusion that clearly states the main point that you have shown with your analysis. Here's why students love Scribbr's proofreading services Trustpilot. Is this article helpful? He writes and edits for Scribbr, and reads a lot of books in his spare time. Other students also liked. How to write a thesis statement A thesis statement is a sentence that sums up the central point of your essay.

It usually comes at the end of the introduction. The Response Essay The response essay is likely the most informal type of literary analysis essay students will encounter in a literature course. The following are some questions students might respond to when writing a response essay: First impressions: When reading the title and first lines, what impression did you get from the text? How did this impression change as you read the rest of the story or poem?

What might the title indicate about the story or poem? Characters: What kind of character is the main character of the story or poem? Are they likable? Which character do you like or relate to the most, and why?

Which character do you dislike the most, and why? What kinds of characters dynamic, round, flat, static are featured in this story? Tone: How would you describe the tone of the story? What words, phrases, images, or snippets of dialogue indicate this tone? Figurative language: What figurative language or literary devices do you notice? Why do you think certain images appear? What kinds of patterns of language do you notice, and what significance might these patterns or literary devices have on the story or poem?

In addition to these basic literary analysis questions, some helpful tips for writing this kind of essay: Take notes as you read. Use highlighters to mark quotations or passages that jump out at you, along with post-it notes or page clips to mark those pages so you can find them again when writing the essay.

Don't be afraid to write notes in the margins of the book. If you must sell back the book to the bookstore, or don't want to mark the book for other reasons, you can use post-it notes to write your responses. Essentially, effective note-taking is like having a conversation with the text. Keep a document or journal open to record your ideas as you read. For example, refer to the image at the top of this page. This way, you can begin responding to the text as you read it, making efficient use of your time.

You can then simply develop your reading notes in the essay. Cite passages to support your analyses. Like in an argumentative or persuasive essay, be ready to drop quotations or paraphrase into the essay to support your analysis and show those reading your essay examples of what you are talking about. Be ready to provide page or line numbers to cite the source.

TYPE MY HISTORY LITERATURE REVIEW

The fact that his life was hard seemed to make him bear down all the more. On the other hand, I can think of a man in my neighborhood who for all the years I've known him has done nothing with his life. He spends whole days smoking and looking at cars going by. He is a burned-out case. Somewhere in the past his problems must have become too much for him, and he gave up. He could have found meaning in his life by deciding to fight his troubles like Jim, but he didn't, and now he is a sad shadow of a man.

Without determination and the desire to face his hardships, he lost his chance to make his life meaningful. Concluding paragraph. Skip to navigation Search Hunter. Advanced Search…. Murray and Anna C. For magazines, give the date of publication. Write an informative summary of the material. Condense the content of the work by highlighting its main points and key supporting points.

Use direct quotations from the work to illustrate important ideas. Summarize the material so that the reader gets a general sense of all key aspects of the original work. Do not discuss in great detail any single aspect of the work, and do not neglect to mention other equally important points. Also, keep the summary objective and factual. Do not include in the first part of the paper your personal reaction to the work; your subjective impression will form the basis of the second part of your paper.

How is the assigned work related to ideas and concerns discussed in the course for which you are preparing the paper? For example, what points made in the course textbook, class discussions, or lectures are treated more fully in the work? How is the work related to problems in our present-day world? How is the material related to your life, experiences, feelings and ideas? For instance, what emotions did the work arouse in you? Did the work increase your understanding of a particular issue?

Did it change your perspective in any way? Evaluate the merit of the work: the importance of its points, its accuracy, completeness, organization, and so on. You should also indicate here whether or not you would recommend the work to others, and why. Make sure each major paragraph presents and then develops a single main point. For example, in the sample report that follows, the first paragraph summarizes the book, and the three paragraphs that follow detail three separate reactions of the student writer to the book.

The student then closes the report with a short concluding paragraph. Support any general points you make or attitudes you express with specific reasons and details. Statements such as "I agree with many ideas in this article" or "I found the book very interesting" are meaningless without specific evidence that shows why you feel as you do.

Look at the sample report closely to see how the main point or topic sentence of each paragraph is developed by specific supporting evidence. Organize your material. Follow the basic plan of organization explained above: a summary of one or more paragraphs, a reaction of two or more paragraphs, and a conclusion. Also, use transitions to make the relationships among ideas in the paper clear.

Edit the paper carefully for errors in grammar, mechanics, punctuation, word use, and spelling. Cite paraphrased or quoted material from the book or article you are writing about, or from any other works, by using the appropriate documentation style. If you are unsure what documentation style is required or recommended, ask you instructor. PS--If your students need to know about literary criticism, c heck out this Website, Introduction to Modern Literary Theory , which provides a comprehensive overview of numerous types of criticism, including key terms and many useful resources.

The typical length is pages typed, double-spaced; with a minimum of 5 paragraphs , but it can be longer. Students should include at least quotes per paragraph, providing context and explanation to illustrate how the evidence supports their arguments. By the end of their high school careers, students should be able to plan and write a literary response paper on their own, with minimal input from the teacher.

Along the way, though, they will need coaching on how to read and write analytically.

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