bloody essay folkloristics in in mary mirror psychoanalytic

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Bloody essay folkloristics in in mary mirror psychoanalytic

Hunt and kill. Where the heck is Buffy? By Alan Dundes. Jack- are even more disappointing. Latham locates a son: University Press of Mississippi, Where is Robocop? Mall culture, ian interpretation has set him against the grain generation X, homoeroticism, the Internet, of mainstream folkloristics. Dundes, working on contemporary tive of making sense of nonsense while seeking American data, reveals equivalencies enduring to make the unconscious conscious.

Various throughout centuries and across continents. In this strain, alone would be an excellent reason for reading Dundes explains an oozing cut in the mirror and pondering this stimulating book. By Gaston tal area on one hand, and of evidence that Maspero. By Petr Janecek. Meaning of Folklore By Mei Yue. Yet, he has successfully carved out a niche, and Dundes makes his bias clear that one benefits from psychoanalytic tools, such as an understanding of triadic relations, in order to fully grasp the import of folklore.

However, he notes that although some decades have passed since he was in graduate school, it remains unusual for a folklorist to utilize such an epistemology, and that most attempts to understand folklore via psychoanalysis may be attributed to Freud and his early circle. Dundes argues that one limitation of that early work is that the database utilized by most psychoanalysts is limited to the Grimm tales, classical myths, and the Old Testament.

As the work under review makes clear, such a sample is simply not representative. This volume of seven essays two of which were co-authored with his sociology professor daughter Lauren contains work that was published in journals not typically frequented by analysts such as the Journal of American Folklore. However, the content being an engagement with projection and gender identity is quickly noted as familiar ground to those interested in psychoanalysis.

To consider projection and myth together is, as Freud demonstrated, to lend an unease to the domain of religion. In his consideration of religion, Dundes notes that cultural relativism is a key to a complete understanding. Within psychoanalysis such context specificity is not traced to a post-modern turn but to an idea that crystallized in a seminar co-led by the psychoanalyst Abram Kardiner and the anthropologist Ralph Linton at Columbia University in that the relationship to a deity is modeled after the particular relationship between parent and child in a given culture emphasis added.

To illustrate this psychoanalytic ethnography, Dundes considers the subjects of fasting, self-mutilation, and dues otiosus the creator god who withdraws after creating. In consideration of fasting, he wonders why fasting would lead an authority to yield in the favor of the person who has stopped eating. The work of Menninger and others who have focused on infantile aggression as an explanation is problematized by Dundes due to his conception that their theory departs from ethnographic data, and he concludes that fasting does not please a deity, but forces the deity to engage in a relationship by demanding attention.

Dundes further notes along cross-cultural lines that adults typically do not engage in fasting in cultures in which infants feed on schedule as the experience of intense hunger is absent from that culture. He furthers this culturally specific relational thesis in treating self-mutilation.

Dundes suggests that in the case of an indifferent parent or deity, crying out when hurt may be the only means of attracting attention. Extending this line even further, Dundes illustrates that dues otiosus is found to a greater extent in polygamous societies in which the father is often not at home. Commonly linked to religion is the case of the vampire. In keeping to his project, Dundes considers religious explanation of the creature created by the devil to be along the lines of other limited literal explanations for the tale, such as an explanation proposed by some psychologists most recently, Bourguignon, that the legend is based on cases of mentally disturbed individuals who drank blood from their victims.

In considering the case of vampire as folklore, Dundes turns to the facts of the story: that the vampire is dead and thirsty. First, Dundes illustrates the manner in which an absence of hydration is a common theme in Indo-European and Semitic narratives concerning the dead the vampire is not a universal figure, Dundes notes.

In short, the vampire is considered a projective fantasy based in guilt created by perceived abandonment by a grief stricken relation of the deceased. In moving toward gendered terrain, Dundes notes an interesting trend: fairy tales are always told from the perspective of a child. Here boys have to defeat giants in stories of absent fathers Jack in the Beanstalk is an example Dundes provides and girls typically battle witches when mother is absent.

Dundes suggests that these creatures might well be considered parental imagos. This story of a siren who is in conflict with a false bride was recently depicted by Disney, and Dundes places a focus on the film. An example provided by Dundes from Portugal in is notably striking in regard to danger, as the mermaid may crush her male lovers.

To further round out his treatment of gender, additional chapters take to task what Dundes considers a modern day menstruation ritual—young girls huddled together in a dark bathroom to see if a ghost named Bloody Mary appears, and the oft documented ritual of collegiate hazing—where dominant sorority sisters act like men and male pledges are infantilized and feminized with the hope that like members of the Army, they will be made magically into phallic men.

Moving from mermaids and vampires to the college campus, one is treated to a rich ethnographic history and skillful use of psychoanalytic theory throughout the text.

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Bloody Mary in the Mirror mixes Sigmund Freud with vampires and The Little Mermaid to see what new light psychoanalysis can bring to folklore techniques and forms. Ever since Freud published his analysis of Jewish jokes in and his disciple Otto Rank followed with his groundbreaking The Myth of the Birth of the Hero in , the psychoanalytic study of folklore has been an acknowledged part of applied psychoanalysis.

However, psychoanalysts, handicapped by their limited knowledge of folklore techniques, have tended to confine their efforts to the Bible, to classical mythology, and to the Grimm fairy tales. Most folklorists have been slow to consider psychoanalysis as a method of interpreting folklore. One notable exception is folklorist Alan Dundes. In the seven fascinating essays of Bloody Mary in the Mirror , psychoanalytic theory illuminates such folklore genres as legend in the vampire tale , folktale in the ancient Egyptian tale of two brothers , custom in fraternity hazing and ritual fasting , and games in the modern Greek game of "Long Donkey".

One of two essays Dundes co-authored with his daughter Lauren Dundes, professor of sociology at Western Maryland College, successfully probes the content of Disney's The Little Mermaid , yielding new insights into this popular reworking of a Hans Christian Andersen favorite. Among folk rituals investigated is the girl's game of "Bloody Mary. The plausible analysis of this well-known--if somewhat puzzling--American rite is one of many surprising and enlightening finds in this book.

All of the essays in this remarkable volume create new takes on old traditions. Bloody Mary in the Mirror is an expedition into psychoanalytic folklore techniques and constitutes a giant step towards realizing the potential Freud's work promises for folklore studies. Alan Dundes is professor of anthropology and folklore at the University of California, Berkeley. Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves.

Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus. Need an account? Click here to sign up. Download Free PDF. Vaz da Silva. A short summary of this paper. In an episode from the third and others. Yet detail. Chapter 1 looks at S. Too bound Vampire Junction Walsworth, and the to the mindless routine of the predator. Hunt and kill. Where the heck is Buffy? By Alan Dundes. Jack- are even more disappointing.

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Within psychoanalysis such context specificity is not traced to a post-modern turn but to an idea that crystallized in a seminar co-led by the psychoanalyst Abram Kardiner and the anthropologist Ralph Linton at Columbia University in that the relationship to a deity is modeled after the particular relationship between parent and child in a given culture emphasis added. To illustrate this psychoanalytic ethnography, Dundes considers the subjects of fasting, self-mutilation, and dues otiosus the creator god who withdraws after creating.

In consideration of fasting, he wonders why fasting would lead an authority to yield in the favor of the person who has stopped eating. The work of Menninger and others who have focused on infantile aggression as an explanation is problematized by Dundes due to his conception that their theory departs from ethnographic data, and he concludes that fasting does not please a deity, but forces the deity to engage in a relationship by demanding attention.

Dundes further notes along cross-cultural lines that adults typically do not engage in fasting in cultures in which infants feed on schedule as the experience of intense hunger is absent from that culture. He furthers this culturally specific relational thesis in treating self-mutilation. Dundes suggests that in the case of an indifferent parent or deity, crying out when hurt may be the only means of attracting attention.

Extending this line even further, Dundes illustrates that dues otiosus is found to a greater extent in polygamous societies in which the father is often not at home. Commonly linked to religion is the case of the vampire. In keeping to his project, Dundes considers religious explanation of the creature created by the devil to be along the lines of other limited literal explanations for the tale, such as an explanation proposed by some psychologists most recently, Bourguignon, that the legend is based on cases of mentally disturbed individuals who drank blood from their victims.

In considering the case of vampire as folklore, Dundes turns to the facts of the story: that the vampire is dead and thirsty. First, Dundes illustrates the manner in which an absence of hydration is a common theme in Indo-European and Semitic narratives concerning the dead the vampire is not a universal figure, Dundes notes. In short, the vampire is considered a projective fantasy based in guilt created by perceived abandonment by a grief stricken relation of the deceased.

In moving toward gendered terrain, Dundes notes an interesting trend: fairy tales are always told from the perspective of a child. Here boys have to defeat giants in stories of absent fathers Jack in the Beanstalk is an example Dundes provides and girls typically battle witches when mother is absent. Dundes suggests that these creatures might well be considered parental imagos. This story of a siren who is in conflict with a false bride was recently depicted by Disney, and Dundes places a focus on the film.

An example provided by Dundes from Portugal in is notably striking in regard to danger, as the mermaid may crush her male lovers. To further round out his treatment of gender, additional chapters take to task what Dundes considers a modern day menstruation ritual—young girls huddled together in a dark bathroom to see if a ghost named Bloody Mary appears, and the oft documented ritual of collegiate hazing—where dominant sorority sisters act like men and male pledges are infantilized and feminized with the hope that like members of the Army, they will be made magically into phallic men.

Moving from mermaids and vampires to the college campus, one is treated to a rich ethnographic history and skillful use of psychoanalytic theory throughout the text. Indeed, it has taken some time for a constructivist frame to enter into mainstream discourse within psychoanalysis, and some may argue that it remains outside of mainstream psychoanalysis.

Yet, Dundes shows that the seeds of this discourse have been with psychoanalysis from the start, and for his part he does well in illustrating the utilization of a contextualist psychoanalysis to scholars both in and outside of the field. Bourguignon, A. Schlesinger and E. Revitch Eds. Springfield: Charles C. Thomas, Ducat, S.

Ever since Freud published his analysis of Jewish jokes in and his disciple Otto Rank followed with his groundbreaking The Myth of the Birth of the Hero in , the psychoanalytic study of folklore has been an acknowledged part of applied psychoanalysis. However, psychoanalysts, handicapped by their limited knowledge of folklore techniques, have tended to confine their efforts to the Bible, to classical mythology, and to the Grimm fairy tales.

Most folklorists have been slow to consider psychoanalysis as a method of interpreting folklore. One notable exception is folklorist Alan Dundes. In the seven fascinating essays of Bloody Mary in the Mirror , psychoanalytic theory illuminates such folklore genres as legend in the vampire tale , folktale in the ancient Egyptian tale of two brothers , custom in fraternity hazing and ritual fasting , and games in the modern Greek game of "Long Donkey".

One of two essays Dundes co-authored with his daughter Lauren Dundes, professor of sociology at Western Maryland College, successfully probes the content of Disney's The Little Mermaid , yielding new insights into this popular reworking of a Hans Christian Andersen favorite. Among folk rituals investigated is the girl's game of "Bloody Mary.

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Most folklorists have been slow to consider psychoanalysis as a method of interpreting folklore. Share Full Text for Free. Ever since Freud published his limited knowledge of folklore techniques, have tended to confine their efforts to the Bible, to Myth of the Birth of Grimm fairy tales. Submitting a report will send doesn't load Other:. Recommended Articles Loading There are us an email through our. One notable exception is folklorist. PARAGRAPHPress of Mississippi Labirint Ozon. Read and print from thousands of top scholarly journals. Details Include any more information that will help us locate the issue and fix it faster for you. How was the reading experience.

Bloody Mary in the Mirror mixes Sigmund Freud with vampires and The Little Mermaid to see what new light psychoanalysis can bring to folklore techniques and forms. Bloody Mary in the Mirrormixes Sigmund Freud with vampires andThe Little Mermaidto see what new light psychoanalysis can bring to folklore techniques and. Download Citation | Bloody Mary in the Mirror: Essays in Psychoanalytic Folkloristics (review) | Journal of American Folklore () Alan.